Video: Build a Roubo Workbench Part 8 -The Base Assembly and the Festool Domino

In this video series I show you how to make a solid Roubo workbench on a budget using readily available timber and hardware.

In this video I show how to make the base of our workbench using both the Festool Domino as well as a more assessable method.


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Buy the plans: http://www.jordswoodshop.com/product/roubo-workbench-plans-sketchup/

Subscribe to this channel: www.youtube.com/JordsWoodShop
My second channel: www.youtube.com/JWSblog

 

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33 Comments

  1. Again, very well done. Waiting for the next video!

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  2. Okay, after picking up my jaw I think I’ll have to go with the standard way of doing a mortise and tenon.

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  3. Good on you Jord for tailoring this to your Australian audience. Really nice to get the metric measurements, the joinery and other methods in more commonly accessible techniques.Hope you do really well with your furniture shop alsoThanks

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  4. Looking forward to the leg vice video.

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  5. Really appreciate you showing new tech (domino), but omitting the process for those of us who can’t afford the tech.

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  6. thanks from here in USA i love your vids. i’m to build a bench like that thanks

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  7. there’s no real reason why you couldn’t use 90×135 legs instead of the 90×120 legs, is there?

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  8. Great job so far Jord!

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  9. I noticed that all of the Fest tools are high dollar. They must be very good at what they do, so I guess you pay the price. Thanks for the info on that.

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  10. Nice to see a bit of footage on the Festool Domino, would it be possible to see how it creates to slot though, IE without having timber blocking the view.

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  11. Jord,

    I read your posts regularly including this build. I really enjoy the dialog you provide along with the build itself. As always, another great presentation.

    Thank you

    Keep up the great work.

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  12. Nice one mate, almost finished now! N.

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  13. To k13ehr, there are several videos on YouTube showing how the domino works. Thanks Jord for showing us how to build this great work bench.

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  14. Nice job!…. kinda feel like I could use a new bench and this might be the inspiration! Did you give any thought to grain direction when laminating the legs together? Does it matter?

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  15. wouldn’t have one big mortise and tenon would have been stronger and more stable that two very much smaller dowels? You used mortise and tenons mostly everywhere else why change the joinery?

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  16. Don’t sell out to the big companies, I’ve seen channels ruined by sponsorship.

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  17. Another option for the loose tennon joinery is to use a router to make the mortice. And to make the tennon, just use stock that is the same thickness of the router bit, used to make the mortice, round the edges of the tennon stock and cut to length of the depth of both mortices. For better explination check out WoodSmith’s website and search under loose tennon joinery.

    Cheers!

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  18. Dude…….you’ve made my day………NO DADO STACK……….Here in the UK they have been banned. Most videos on the net all have reference to using them on every job……..Keep up the good work

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  19. With the Domino, do you have to use their biscuits? Or is there a way to easily make the biscuits yourself?

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  20. I’ve seen Festool products in videos and on other web sites before. To me, it seems needlessly expensive. Perhaps it is good, but I just can’t believe it is thousands-of-dollars good. For a hand tool.I wonder if this same operation could be accomplished nearly identically using a doweling jig. Given a sufficiently large dowel, wouldn’t this provide equivalent structural integrity?

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  21. Nice video. Maybe it is worth noticing that loose tenons can be also cut with a router. Probably you need a purpose built jig, especially for the top cuts, but I am sure it can be done. it should take more than dominoes but still quite less than hand cut tenons.

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  22. AWESOME JORDY GREAT IDEA GREAT WORK KNACKER!!!!!!

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  23. 2:30 flip it around eh? haha. I notice you realised before you actually cut it

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  24. So help me understand this: Why wouldn’t you have to worry about the expansion and contraction of the top?

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  25. Love my domino! Picked it up almost unused for $600 with 3 extra cutters.

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  26. You had to go and ruin a great video series by breaking out the
    Festool..Seems like every youtuber is doing that these days..

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  27. I’ve enjoyed all the videos. Even this one with the evil Festool. Keep
    doing what you do.

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  28. With the Domino, do you have to buy their biscuits? Or can the tool make
    the biscuits too?

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  29. tu parle trop , ça devient ennuyeux

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  30. Festool and Maffell are awesome companies. If you can afford them then I
    see no problem with owning them because they make a job much quicker and
    usually better. If you cannot afford them there is really no need to knock
    them because they are awesome tools.

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  31. Hey Jords, question about the design of the base: Wouldn’t the expansion & contraction of the bench top break apart the joints between the upper rails & the legs? I can see how the there might be enough room between the top and the lower rails for it not to matter, but it seems like the upper rails would be under a lot of pressure from the seasonal movement of the top. Am I wrong? Thanks — and great video series, btw!

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